Let's talk about coffee, shall we?

So remember that one time I told you I considered myself a coffee connoisseur? OK, wait. Maybe I never told you that, but I did consider myself one. The Fiance and I, we have a hand-me-down coffee pot. And as of the weekend, we've been using it daily.

A pot of coffee in the morning, maybe one in the evening. Classic roast or French vanilla. It's all very delicious, I think. And I prepare it with my own two hands. Two hands, I most recently discovered, that have been making it ALL WRONG.

(Dear The Fiance, you see that cup of coffee in your hands right now? Spit it out. Sincerely, me).

We read the directions, we did. And from what I can recall, it read something along the lines of, "One tablespoon of coffee per serving. Or pot. Or, whatever, just throw some coffee in the filter." So that's what I did. Put ONE TABLESPOON of coffee grounds into the filter, and 12 CUPS of water into the coffee maker.

And we've been drinking this coffee morning after morning, all week. It's refreshing, hot. Not very bitter. At all. In fact, IS this coffee? It's unusually light in color, but whatever. We MADE COFFEE. We felt like champions. And we drank it like champions.

So I get to work this afternoon, feeling high on Coffee Wisdom, and thought I'd brew a pot. As I lift the old filter, and its contents of soaked coffee grounds, out of the pot, I think to myself, "Gosh, that's a LOT of coffee grounds. Much more than one tablespoon." Of course, I inquire about this, and make it known that MY coffee pot only needs ONE tablespoon of coffee, not six. God, how wasteful.

Everyone - every single coffee fiend I know - stares at me like I grew a third arm.

"What?"

"You've only been using ONE tablespoon of coffee?"

"Yes, that's what it says."

"Yes. If you're making ONE cup of coffee. You need one tablespoon per SERVING, which is two cups. Six, Krista. You need SIX tablespoons."

"But..."

"SIX."

Silence.

"Isn't your coffee, like, tan? Watered down?"

"Well, I mean, it's light, but... "

"I don't mean to laugh at you, but, well, I'm laughing at you."

And this is how I learned to properly make coffee. Oops.